The Nissan Rogue is now entering its tenth year of production, making it an inveterate member of the Nissan lineup. The Rogue has mostly surmounted its teething problems, coming in as a refined and competitive crossover SUV that can give others in its class a serious run for their money. While all is not perfect with the car, those seeking a lower-cost crossover SUV will be pleasantly surprised by how many things the Rogue does well.

There is no disputing taste, as they say. Some drivers love the exterior styling while others are lukewarm. What’s not in dispute is that, in a market chock-full of imitators and lookalikes, the Rogue is 100-percent, pure Nissan. It’s rugged, angular styling makes it instantly recognizable among the amorphous blob of crossover SUVs that populate the current market. If its aesthetics are disputable, its originality is not.

The Rogue’s power plant and drivetrain are not spectacular, but they’re also perfectly competent, in almost every way. The 2.5 liter, inline-four engine is mated to a continuously variable transmission. The engine, producing 170 horsepower and 175 pound-feet of torque, is capable of propelling the Rogue from 0 to 60 in 8.5 seconds, not blazingly fast but respectable for the crossover SUV class.

The interior is fairly spacious. With up to 70 cubic feet of available cargo space, with the seats all folded down, the Rogue compares favorably to other vehicles in its class. The interior styling is a dramatic upgrade from the first generation models. While some have complained about the perceived Spartan quality of the cabin, it is nonetheless an eminently user-friendly and high-tech affair.

With available textured leather seats, a booming sound system and a 5-inch multi-function display, the Rogue matches up with many of its competitors in cabin comfort and style. The driver is informed of speed, RPMs and other crucial information by large, easy-to-read analogue gauges. Unlike prior generations, the dash, chrome accents and appointments have an upscale feel. The ride still leaves a bit to be desired, but this is a known trade-off with crossover SUVs.

Overall, the Nissan Rogue is a solid entrant into a competitive niche market. It has ample space, a comfortable and stylish interior and a unique exterior look. For those who want the fuel economy and agility of a car but also need the hauling capacity of an SUV, the Rogue is a good choice.

Leasing a Nissan Rogue has many benefits over purchasing

If the main cost of leasing the vehicle you drive is not owning it, than the main benefit is saving you on the steep costs of ownership. Frankly speaking, owning new automobiles is quite badly overrated. The average car will lose 10 percent of its value, the second it drives off the lot. By the end of its third year, it will have lost more than half of its original value.

Add to this the risks associated with the resale market, the costs of having to ready a car for sale and the potentially huge time investment of selling a car yourself, and it quickly becomes apparent that, for most people, letting professional car dealers handle the dirty work of selling cars is often the best route to take.

In addition to that, leasing saves you potentially massive sums on up-front costs. Aside from typically requiring little more than the first months payment to drive the car off the lot, leasing provides potentially huge savings on the monthly payments. A typical Nissan Rogue bought on bank loan may have a monthly payment in excess of $500. The same car, when leased, can often be obtained for as little as $150 per month.