Leasing a Nissan Rogue in New Jersey
The Nissan Rogue has now been the crossover entrant to the automaker’s lineup for nearly a decade. After working out some issues with the first generation of a ground-up design, the latest version of the Rogue represents a solid effort from Nissan to cut into its competitors’ market. Aside from the loyal following of core Rogue fans that the previous generation of the car has cultivated, this newest, face-lifted and considerably redesigned version is sure to be a hit with the public at large.

The Rogue’s exterior styling proves that the vehicle’s designers were willing to live up to its name. Many of the rules that seem to have constrained the imaginations of the competitions design teams have simply been ignored with the Rogue. The vehicle features an grimacing facade, reminiscent of some of the manufacturer’s more ferocious, high-performance products, such as the supercar-eating GTR. The Rogue features idiosyncratic windows, with a rear windshield that some think is too narrow. It also has a very aggressive, angular styling, with sharp grooves and prominent lines across the entire body. These unique features give it a singular appearance, in a market segment dominated by largely undifferentiated, low-drag-coefficient airfoils that look like they weren’t just designed on a computer, but by one. A little personality is a welcome touch for a crossover.

The engine may not quite live up to the ferocious suggestion of some of the exterior styling elements, but it is nonetheless a competent power plant. The Rogue features a standard 2.5 liter, inline four-cylinder engine that produces 170 horsepower and puts 175 pound-feet of torque to the wheels. At these numbers, the Rogue isn’t winning any drag races. But it can get a carload of skiers up a mountain or get to the family cottage, four hours away, as good as anyone else’s motor.

That said, the optional hybrid electric-gasoline engine is a bit wanting. Only producing 141 horsepower, the hybrid engine pushes the Rogue into the realm of under powered SUVs, not a good place to be when the going gets demanding. On top of this lack of potency, the hybrid engine only allows for a 2 miles per gallon gain over the 2.5 liter gasoline engine, with the latter getting 33 miles per gallon on the highway and the former getting 35. Given the cost and the fact that there are production model non-hybrid, 140 horsepower engines that could yield far more than 35 miles per gallon in a 3,300 pound car, the hybrid engine option is a disappointment and probably not worth the investment, for all but the most fervently environmentally conscious of buyers.

On the other hand, the new generation’s interior is quite an improvement over its predecessor. Sleekly designed, gone is the cheap ambiance of the old Rogue cabin. With tasteful chrome accents and optional textured leather seats, the current Rogue’s interior is both comfortable and stylish, making long commutes and road trips less taxing. Some would also argue that the ride in the current model is a substantial improvement over prior generations.

All said, the Nissan Rogue puts up a serious challenge to its competitors. With decent power, a solid design, both inside and out, as well as good fuel economy and a price that’s hard to argue with, the Nissan Rogue is a great choice for the busy people who need the capabilities of a crossover.

Leasing a new Nissan Rogue may be better than buying

There are many reasons to consider leasing a new Nissan Rogue over buying one. But the single most compelling reason is that it can save you tens of thousands of dollars in up-front and near-term costs.

Current Rogues can be leased for as little as $150 per month, less than half what a typical bank payment would be.

Ask about current leasing deals on a Nissan Rogue today.